webofgoodnews
webofgoodnews:

Girl, 12, who lost ear to a raccoon grows a new one — in her arm
At only 12 years old, Charlotte Ponce has already conquered what sounds like the impossible. After losing her ear and other parts of her face in an accident when she was a baby, Charlotte now has a new ear — one she grew in her arm.
Charlotte and her adoptive parents eventually sought out reconstructive surgery options, meeting with Dr. Kongkrit Chaiyasate, a plastic surgeon at Michigan’s Beaumont Children’s Hospital. He filled in Charlotte’s cheek and constructed a new nose using cartilage and skin from other parts of her body. The toughest obstacle, however, was figuring out how to replace her missing ear.
So the doctor decided to grow Charlotte a new ear — in her arm. Using her own rib cartilage, he shaped Charlotte a new ear and sewed it into her arm to allow skin to grow around the ear frame. 
Three months after creating the ear, Charlotte underwent an eight-hour surgery to remove the ear from her arm and attach it to her head. He also inserted a tube in the center of the new ear that acts as an ear canal, completely restoring Charlotte’s hearing.
Read more and see video
—She also had to have work on her cheek, mouth, and nose, but the ear was the only part that had to be grown on her arm.
Webofgoodnews.com

webofgoodnews:

Girl, 12, who lost ear to a raccoon grows a new one — in her arm

At only 12 years old, Charlotte Ponce has already conquered what sounds like the impossible. After losing her ear and other parts of her face in an accident when she was a baby, Charlotte now has a new ear — one she grew in her arm.

Charlotte and her adoptive parents eventually sought out reconstructive surgery options, meeting with Dr. Kongkrit Chaiyasate, a plastic surgeon at Michigan’s Beaumont Children’s Hospital. He filled in Charlotte’s cheek and constructed a new nose using cartilage and skin from other parts of her body. The toughest obstacle, however, was figuring out how to replace her missing ear.

So the doctor decided to grow Charlotte a new ear — in her arm. Using her own rib cartilage, he shaped Charlotte a new ear and sewed it into her arm to allow skin to grow around the ear frame. 

Three months after creating the ear, Charlotte underwent an eight-hour surgery to remove the ear from her arm and attach it to her head. He also inserted a tube in the center of the new ear that acts as an ear canal, completely restoring Charlotte’s hearing.

Read more and see video

—She also had to have work on her cheek, mouth, and nose, but the ear was the only part that had to be grown on her arm.

Webofgoodnews.com

webofgoodnews
webofgoodnews:

The mirror man, a man who travels through Cambodia helping amputees with phantom limb pain through mirror therapy
One of the few Khmer words Stephen Sumner knows is chhue. It means ‘pain’, and it’s something Cambodian people know a lot about from their three-decade-long civil war. Stephen, 53, is a brawny Canadian with an ebullient, even boisterous, manner. This is his third time here in as many years. He rides around on a longtail bicycle with a stack of lightweight mirrors behind the saddle, going to villages, hospitals and physical rehabilitation centres looking for people who have lost their limbs.
In front of Stephen on an upturned pail sits Ven Phath, a soft-spoken, middle-aged father of five. His left trouser leg is rolled up to reveal a stump below the knee, the result of stepping on a mine in 1983. A plasticky prosthetic leg lies beside him.
Ven Phath still experiences pain in his missing foot, and Stephen is showing him how to position a mirror against the inside of his left leg, so the reflection of the right makes it look like both are still intact. “Look. Move. Imagine,” Stephen instructs through an interpreter.
After a couple of minutes of watching his virtual left foot moving, as if revving an imaginary accelerator, Ven Phath smiles and looks up. He says he feels better already. “Tell him,” Stephen says to the interpreter, “if you do this twice a day, ten minutes per session, for five weeks, then chhub chhue.” Pain stop.
Read more
Webofgoodnews.com

webofgoodnews:

The mirror man, a man who travels through Cambodia helping amputees with phantom limb pain through mirror therapy

One of the few Khmer words Stephen Sumner knows is chhue. It means ‘pain’, and it’s something Cambodian people know a lot about from their three-decade-long civil war. Stephen, 53, is a brawny Canadian with an ebullient, even boisterous, manner. This is his third time here in as many years. He rides around on a longtail bicycle with a stack of lightweight mirrors behind the saddle, going to villages, hospitals and physical rehabilitation centres looking for people who have lost their limbs.

In front of Stephen on an upturned pail sits Ven Phath, a soft-spoken, middle-aged father of five. His left trouser leg is rolled up to reveal a stump below the knee, the result of stepping on a mine in 1983. A plasticky prosthetic leg lies beside him.

Ven Phath still experiences pain in his missing foot, and Stephen is showing him how to position a mirror against the inside of his left leg, so the reflection of the right makes it look like both are still intact. “Look. Move. Imagine,” Stephen instructs through an interpreter.

After a couple of minutes of watching his virtual left foot moving, as if revving an imaginary accelerator, Ven Phath smiles and looks up. He says he feels better already. “Tell him,” Stephen says to the interpreter, “if you do this twice a day, ten minutes per session, for five weeks, then chhub chhue.” Pain stop.

Read more

Webofgoodnews.com

sogaysoalive
outrising:

Rock Band Panic! At The Disco Challenge The Westboro Baptist Church With LGBT Charity Donation
Rock band Panic! At The Disco have stood up to the Westboro Baptist Church and donated $1000+ to a gay rights charity in the process.

The band were playing in Kansas City, Missouri, where members of the hateful church had decided to picket their concert. We’re not quite sure why. We’re even sure they’re sure why. But they were there, nevertheless, blasting out a cover of Panic!’s hit I Write Sins Not Tragedies, cunningly renamed You Love Sin! What A Tragedy (clever).
As has become a tradition with WBC protests, the counter-protest follows suit and it was members of the band who came up with the idea to donate $20 to LGBT rights charity the Human Rights Campaign for every Westboro picketer that showed up… Read more.

outrising:

Rock Band Panic! At The Disco Challenge The Westboro Baptist Church With LGBT Charity Donation

Rock band Panic! At The Disco have stood up to the Westboro Baptist Church and donated $1000+ to a gay rights charity in the process.

The band were playing in Kansas City, Missouri, where members of the hateful church had decided to picket their concert. We’re not quite sure why. We’re even sure they’re sure why. But they were there, nevertheless, blasting out a cover of Panic!’s hit I Write Sins Not Tragedies, cunningly renamed You Love Sin! What A Tragedy (clever).

As has become a tradition with WBC protests, the counter-protest follows suit and it was members of the band who came up with the idea to donate $20 to LGBT rights charity the Human Rights Campaign for every Westboro picketer that showed up… Read more.